Swinging into its fourth year, the Jason David's Corner Foundation (JDCF) Annual Celebrity Golf Classic continues to honor the memory of Segun “Shay” Ukome Moruka, cousin of NFL Super Bowl Champion, Jason David, who tragically passed away from nephritis – kidney disease in 2007.

The event will be held on Friday, June 29 at Industry Hills Golf Club and will raise funds to benefit kidney disease research at Kaiser Permanente – Baldwin Park.

"It is important to me that I continue my cousin Shay’s fight for the sake of others who suffer from kidney disease," stated Jason David, founder and president of JDCF.

More than 100 golfers will hit the links for this day of philanthropy and will have an opportunity to experience a golf tournament like no other.

“My cousin Shay had a kidney transplant, his mom being the donor. That kidney failed, but it gave him some more years to live,” stated David. “I think that it could have been detected much sooner by having his blood pressure checked.”

Keeping in line with the foundation’s cause of preventing kidney disease and promoting awareness, clinical volunteers will be available at the event offering pre-screening for those that are high risk of developing kidney disease. The prescreening will consist of basic health questionnaire, height, weight, and blood pressure measurements. Individuals identified in need of a full screening will be contacted and referred for a Free Kidney Disease Screening Day in Fall of 2012.

For golf playing spots, sponsorship information please call Kristel David at (626) 216-0519 or visit jasondavidscorner.org.

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