The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry have released ten films as part of the Heads Together mental health campaign.

The films feature people from all walks of life talking, often with the person that they first opened up to, about the life changing conversation that helped them cope with their mental health problems – from anxiety, alcoholism and depression through to loneliness, trauma and bereavement.

Video: Freddie + Stephen | Heads Together | #oktosay

The first series of films, published on the Heads Together YouTube page and website, includes: two mums of young children; musician Stephen Manderson (Professor Green) and Cricketer Freddie Flintoff; a journalist and her friend; comedian Ruby Wax and her husband Ed; two paramedics based in Blackpool; model Adwoa Aboah with her mum; a blogger and her mum; and writer Alastair Campbell talking with his partner, Fiona.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry said: "Since we launched Heads Together last May, we have seen time and time again that shattering stigma on mental health starts with simple conversations.

“When you realise that mental health problems affect your friends, neighbours, children and spouses, the walls of judgement and prejudice around these issues begin to fall. And we all know that you cannot resolve a mental health issue by staying silent.”

On the release of the films, Their Royal Highnesses said: “We hope these films show people how simple conversations can change the direction of an entire life. Please share them with your friends and families and join us in a national conversation on mental health in the weeks ahead.”

Alongside the film series, Heads Together published the most comprehensive survey of how people in Britain talk about their mental health carried out by YouGov. It shows that almost half of us (46%) have talked recently about mental health, with a quarter of us talking about our own mental health.

“Attitudes to mental health are at a tipping point,” said The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry.

Eight out of ten people who have talked about their own mental health found these conversations helpful. The findings show Britain is ‘opening up’ about its mental health but equally highlight some of the challenges that still remain. Men are less likely to talk than women and people aged 18- 24 are almost twice as likely to discuss mental health than those over 65. Also, fewer than one in five people who have had a conversation have talked to their GP and fewer than one in ten spoke either to a supervisor at work or a counsellor.

Source: Royal.UK

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