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Musician Neil Young is to host his annual Bridge School Benefit Concerts near San Francisco on October 27-28, with an eclectic lineup of acts already confirmed to play.

The two acoustic concerts, to be held at the Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, will feature performers such as John Mayer, Metallica, and Pearl Jam singer, Eddie Vedder. Tom Waits will also perform with the classical string ensemble, The Kronos Quartet. Waits and the Quartet first performed together earlier in 2007, as part of a concert to benefit Richard Gere's Healing the Divide Foundation.

Proceeds from the October shows will benefit Bridge School, a non-profit educational institution in Northern California for children with physical disabilities and severe speech impediments. It was co-founded by Young’s wife, Pegi, in 1986, after three of the couple’s children were born with cerebral palsy and epilepsy. Young organized the first Bridge School Concert in 1986, and with the exception of 1987, has hosted the event every year since.

Many of the performers at the concerts return annually. Eddie Vedder has performed eight times with his band Pearl Jam, and is singing this year with Red Hot Chilli Peppers’ bassist, Flea, and ex Chilli Peppers/Pearl Jam drummer, Jack Irons. Other musicians to perform at this year’s shows include singer/songwriters Tegan and Sara, Regina Spektor, and 50s rocker Jerry Lee Lewis. Neil Young will also perform a set.

Tickets to the shows come in three price tiers – $150, $75, and $39.50, and are available through www.ticketmaster.com.

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